Fly Predators

Do I have your attention? Years ago a friend introduced me to this method of fly control in the barn. Here is my August shipment.

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Every month I get at least 10,000 of these little bugs in a package. When they arrive they look like this.

As you can see they’re packed in wood shavings and as they warm up they come alive! Tiny little bugs hatching from the larvae you see as black pellets in this picture. These little bugs eat fly larvae in the manure in the barn. In July, the hottest most humid month I get 25-50,000 predators. As soon as the larvae become active I sprinkle them in the manure.

I’ve been using this method of fly control for quite a few years now and we do not have very many flies here on the farm. The flies also bite and bother the goats which I hate. Here is the back of the package.

Continued use is key with this method and it costs about $100 for the season. Each month I get a shipment automatically and I try to put them out at night so the chickens don’t eat all of them before they’ve done their job. The chickens see them as tasty morsels – ha!

Moe is visiting for 10 days while her dad is hiking in Estes Park, CO. Hazel loves having Moe stay with us – they play fight and “rassle” many times a day. Moe also likes to retrieve the ball but doesn’t like to bring it back so we always have to play with 2 balls. Just look at this sweet face!

She also likes to sleep on the back of the couch.

Please tell me if you use fly predators or have ever heard of it – does it work for you and what type of livestock do you keep.

Reed and I are having another adventure day this Thursday – watch for the story!

20 thoughts on “Fly Predators

  1. Ann Jenny

    We live in Frederic, WI and use fly predators…same company as you. Just sprinkled my 10,000
    in the donkey pasture :-). This is our third year and we didn’t have animals prior, so not sure how much they have helped. We figure they can’t hurt, so will continue with them.

    Reply
  2. Diane

    Hi Mary, Every blog you send is so interesting to this very small town, non farm girl:) I have never seen anything like those “bugs”, but what a great idea. Moe is huge, but does have a sweet face. We just got back from a week in Canada. Squeak will not let ANYONE pet her except us so she really missed us. Sunday night, she woke me up every hour and a half to pet her. If I didn’t, she bit my hair!!! Such a sweetie.
    I always try to click on the ads. The shoes in this one are so cute:) Can’t wait to hear about Thursday.

    Reply
    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Diane – thank you so much for closing the ads – it pays pennies but it counts up which helps us pay the bill for this blog – pass the word!

      Reply
  3. Anne

    I have been using the Fly Predators for years too and they work well. I have 11 ducks. I sprinkle some around outside the duck pen so the ducks won’t eat them. The rest of the bag is hung (opened) in the duck house. The fly predators will find the manure. I tend to not sprinkle directly on the manure because I clean the bedding every day (spoiled ducks but really I only have 11-not a whole farm to take care of) . This year has been pretty fly free!

    Reply
  4. Michele Greiman

    The guys have been successfully using the Fly Predators for many years in the cattle lots. Seems weird at first but they really work. Well worth the investment.

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  5. Ginny McKenzie

    We have used them for years for our horses.
    Arlo and Moe would be good buddies, Arlo brings the ball halfway then lays down.

    Reply
  6. Carla J

    I am a farm girl at heart. I had not heard of fly predators before reading your post today. The farmers in my family have long since passed on, and I was to young to pay attention to farm talk when our family visited. Moe and our Blue (Golden Retiever) would have a blast together, if Blue would share is ball. His favorite resting place is where our Mousse laid, “all the better to watch those pesky squirrels and birds my dear” she seemed to say when we would comment to her about being there. Mow takes up a bit more space, Mousse was a mini-dachshund.

    Reply
  7. Sandra Pierson

    Mary, I have never heard of these. What if you have no chickens to eat them? And, what if the dogs get to some of the droppings with the bugs on them?
    My daughter in law has horses but critters to eat these bugs after they do their job.

    Sandy

    Reply
  8. Pat Smith

    Wow! You learn something new every day. I was a city Iowa girl ( if you can call Ottumwa a City). I wonder if this is a newer way to manage flies on farms or have farmers been using this method for years? Really unique.

    Reply
    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Pat – I believe this is newer but don’t know how recent – I’ve been using them about 10 years.

      Reply
  9. Colleen

    Interesting we had horses and used sticky hanging fly things, also an automatic canned spray.
    Now we have a tract house with occasional flys that come from who knows where
    If these had been available I would have used them especially since we are in California where there is no freezing weather to kill them. Of course then I wonder if they are allowed in California

    So good that these are helping the goats live with fewer flys. Flies are such a nuisance and just plain yucky

    Reply
  10. Mulvey Rita

    Mary I have never heard of them we have chickens which are fly free. But there are cows behind us that are covered in flies. My cousin was just complaining about how bad the flies are this year she has horses. I will foward this to her. Love reading your posts learn something new every time.
    Thanks
    Rita

    Reply
  11. Becky from IA

    Those fly predators are a wonderful option for you…..Moe, she’s so sweet!!!! She looks real comfy on the back of the couch. I bet Hazel sleeps good at nite……hahaha!

    Reply
    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Paula – the type of livestock makes no difference. Manure equals flies. Fly predators eat the fly larvae stopping the reproduction process. I get mine from Spalding Labs, 1-888-562-8160. They’re worth every penny!

      Reply

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