It’s Saturday – Time To Measure the Corn!

Tim’s corn popped out of the ground two weeks ago today, May 26. Last week it was 12-1/2″ tall.

Today, June 9, it measured 22-1/2″!! It grew 10″ in one week!

Amazing! I’m from Ioway, Ioway! That’s where the tall corn grows!

And baling the alfalfa. Someone asked how it can be cut, raked and baled in such a short time. It all depends on the weather. It was raked at least twice – turning it over helps the drying process. Whenever a farmer has “hay down”, rain is not welcome. We got lucky – it rained 2″ in the night after this was baled!

Our friend, Dean, had some help getting it baled – Rick sometimes drives the tractor.

This morning Dean brought his daughter Brittney and they put it in the haymow for me. How’s that for a good neighbor?

We have a bale elevator that the bales ride on up the steps. Brittney takes the bale off the hayrack and puts it on the elevator while Dean waits at the top to take it off and stack it. I am so thankful for this help!

Reed and I went to Mandy’s Open House at Farm Chick Quilts today. I ran into so many of our old customers who were there shopping. Connie was there, too. Very fun!

After that fun we went on to a nursery near Mason City. Just look at this wisteria vine!

We looked at everything and it’s all so tempting …. but so much work when I get it home. We bought one giant hosta and Reed’s dad, Kevin, is going to dig the hole tomorrow.

When we got home Reed wanted to learn punchneedle so I showed him. And then he drew his own design, a chicken, and got started. I foresee another 4-H project before the fair.

Check back here tomorrow for Connie’s favorite rhubarb muffin recipe.

One last picture from the farm – Emma can find the darndest places to nap!

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18 thoughts on “It’s Saturday – Time To Measure the Corn!

  1. Jeanine

    I clicked on “Home” at the top of my email, but again, all I found were faded out blogs posts. I don’t know how else to explain what was there. There were no ads. I really enjoyed your blog today. I remember those hay baling days years ago here.

    Reply
  2. Mary

    I, too, came to click on some ads for you. I saw an ancestry ad abd a cheese as. Is that what you mean? I thought corn was measured by the length of its stalk so “knee high by the fourth” would be about 24-30″ tall.

    Reply
  3. Linda

    So I clicked on your title blog, I did see some ads but nothing to x on. I am a follower of Bonnie Hunter, and she too, wants us to x the ads to help pay for all she does for us. So I understand the concept, I just don’t see how to help you.

    Reply
  4. Karen Gaither

    I guess since you don’t have camp in the Hay Mow, you can use it for its intended purpose. The hay elevator is awesome. I remember that awesome Iowa Corn!

    Reply
  5. Betty Klosterman

    Knee high by the 4th of July is years old. The hybrid seed corn grows so fast and the corn may be shoulder high by the 4th of July these days if they get rain, etc.
    Oh, Mary, we sure like hearing all about baled hay and all the farm stuff. And I can see the field of corn, just everything on your farm and remember all our visits. Keep it up.
    Betty

    Reply
  6. Kate Schloemer

    I just absolutely love reading your blog. You keep so busy and your so inspiring.
    The corn is growing fast here in Minnesota too. But being an Iowa girl myself, I always loved to watch how fast the corn grew. I planted my zucchini a week ago and it’s up and was about 4” tall yesterday. Oh what a little warm weather and rain will do.
    Have a great week!!!

    Reply
  7. Suzanne Cook

    I do so look forward to this blog. I clicked on header and got the ads. I’m happy to have ads as long I can still look forward to Chicken Scratch.

    Reply
  8. Kathy

    Love that Reed shows an interest in another home arts project that hopefully he can exhibit with 4-H at fair. Such a worthwhile opportunity to learn life skills. So happy seeing neighbors helping neighbors. A good example of “what goes around, comes around “ as you have helped others and now you deserve some help.

    Reply
  9. sandy

    I clicked on the title & saw an ad for stitch fix & clicked on it….
    I love your blog!
    enjoy your week…….

    Reply
  10. Rebecca

    You have to click on Its saturday, time to measure the corn. Thats where I found ads….
    By the way always loving your pictures and stories.

    Reply
  11. Janet Snyder

    My husband and I have been visiting family in St Cloud, MN in our motorhome. We are from Southern CA and have seen so many fields with corn and have wondered about the growth rate. We are in Indiana now and are surrounded by corn fields. Love it that you are doing Saturday corn measuring.

    Reply
  12. Martha Engstler

    I got hooked on punch needle at your Country Threads maybe around 2013 and love it. Great to see Reed trying another craft which I hope he loves also and he did his own design, good for him. Really enjoy your farm news. Corn here in Pennsylvania is way behind after a cold wet spring.

    Reply
  13. Kay Price

    I really got behind reading your posts. Your pictures of bailing hay and measuring the corn brought back good memories of my youth. My father had passed away when I was eleven. Our grandmother (my Mom’s mother) wanted us to move to a farm that she owned to closer to where she lived and to help take care of the cattle, bale hay and farm the ground raising corn and soybeans and wheat. I became a real farm girl at 11 helping with everything. We even had to capture a cow which was having difficulty giving birth. We caught her and tied her up to the fence post and my Mom, brother and I had to all pull in order to get the calf out. Because it was the first time I ever saw let helped to birth the calf my Grandmother gave me the calf to raise. I can fully understand your joy in watching the crops grow, the new born animals and all.

    Reply
    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Kay – sounds like you have a solid farm background! It’s lots of work but so rewarding.

      Reply

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